Gritty

As Eurogamer reports, Interplay are aiming to make a Fallout MMO. Now I’m getting a bit sceptical as regards MMO news, not least when it comes from a formerly-dead publishing company, and especially when no one seems to be entering the market with any worthwhile ideas or decent handle on how to make a fresh generation of persistent games work. But lets just weigh that for a moment: a Fallout MMO. No orcs, no goblins. A post-apocalypse sci-fi MMO. A gritty MMO. No poncing about pretending to be Luna The Moon Fairy… Sounds like a commercial disaster to me, but you never know. Maybe, just maybe, it would have an audience.

And let us pray to the Gods of development that someone who has been paying attention over the last five years gets put in charge of this one. With a proposed budget of $75 million it could really go somewhere. Please, please, please: no more half-arsed misfires. Look at how players can generate their own content: no more Quest-o-matic 100-spleen collections, and no more level grind. Lets have something that runs itself. (Yes, I /really/ want to have a reason to stop playing Eve, one day.)


6 Responses to “Gritty”

  • Thesper Says:

    Auto assault…without cars!

  • Rossignol Says:

    Not quite. Auto Assault was decidedly not Fallout *with* Cars. It was gaudy, half-arsed attempt at post-apocalypse.

  • Thesper Says:

    I still think signs don’t look good. Seems like Interplay want to make this game without a team in mind or any game mechanics.

    Stuff like EVE and WoW succeed because the dev team has a rock solid vision about what they want their game to be. Seems like they’re going license first, game second, which pretty much dooms it to become a WoW clone unless they randomly end up with the best dev team on the planet.

  • DuBBle Says:

    Or..

    Somebody finally, realistically forms a theory of MMO design whereby the dev team aim to set no limit on their players’ ability to create.

  • Rossignol Says:

    I think ‘no limit’ gives you Second Life, or worse. It’s what the limits to creativity are that is the interesting end of such game design.

  • DuBBle Says:

    I don’t agree Jim. It’s not the limit’s specifics that ensure interesting game design. I’d argue it is the fostering of a meaningful connection between the created and its creator which maketh the game.

    Second Life is an interesting and almost limitless MMO, but I won’t be indulging a second life because the entertainment prospects of SL don’t appeal to me beyond simple curiosity.